Longines and the Heritage Collection: Meaningful Elegance

The word Heritage has acquired its full meaning at Longines, the watch company founded in 1832 in the Swiss Jura by the watchmaker, Auguste Agassiz. Ever since it was first created, its timekeepers have graced the wrists of pioneers in the air, on land and under the sea and now have their own dedicated museum at Saint-Imier. The aesthetics underscoring this historic collection have been given a new lease of life through the use of cutting-edge watchmaking techniques. We like to think of it as a permanent tribute to History through elegance and refinement.

Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7 1935, the Wish to Fly

Once on my wrist, this chronograph awoke the dormant memories of the part of my childhood I spent flying with an adventurous aunt, one of the only female pilots of her generation.

by Joel Grandjean

This watch has revived my long-lost dream of flying and finally attending the classes that would allow me to hold the control stick one day. Therefore, it wouldn’t hurt to be accompanied by the new timekeeping instrument that evokes airborne conquests. The watch, part of the Heritage collection allowed me to reconnect with part of my family’s legacy: the buried memories of a beloved aunt, pilot and a born adventurer.

Longines Heritage Military COSD Full Emotional Hands-On

Longines has a long history and is reviving it through a dedicated series of vintage inspired designs. The latest is their Longines Heritage Military COSD. It is a re-interpretation of a military model used by British Special Force in the 1940s.

by Benjamin Teisseire

I have to admit that, at first sight, I was not overwhelmed with excitement… but as I manipulated it and wore it, I grew fond of the watch. It settled very well on my wrist, which is rather small, and the Nato strap feels very comfortable.

The Longines Heritage 1973. There is no Need to Push!

A few months ago, a large supermarket in north London was closed after several police cars and ambulances attended a shopping bonanza which had evidently got out of control

by Angus Davies

The large UK-based retailer, Tesco, had promoted a tempting array of goods, offered at incredibly low prices. The short-term discounting regime was part of a ‘Black Friday’ promotion, widely employed in the US, but a relatively new concept in British retailing. A melee ensued after bargain-hunting shoppers lost perspective of what was acceptable behaviour. The coverage on national news channels showed seemingly ordinary British citizens aggressively grabbing wide screen televisions with blatant disregard for the safety of their fellow shoppers. It was a depressing spectacle and one which made one question the values systemic of today’s consumerist society.

Pictures Gallery by Watchonista